ò An Experiment in Criticism || ↠ PDF Download by ✓ C.S. Lewis
Aug 17, 2019 - 17:29 PM By C.S. Lewis

Why do we read literature and how do we judge it C.S Lewis s classic analysis springs from the conviction that literature exists for the joy of the reader and that books should be judged by the kind of reading they invite Crucial to his notion of judging literature is a commitment to laying aside expectations and values extraneous to the work, in order to approach it wiWhy do we read literature and how do we judge it C.S Lewis s classic analysis springs from the conviction that literature exists for the joy of the reader and that books should be judged by the kind of reading they invite Crucial to his notion of judging literature is a commitment to laying aside expectations and values extraneous to the work, in order to approach it with an open mind.
  • Title: An Experiment in Criticism
  • Author: C.S. Lewis
  • ISBN: 9780521422819
  • Page: 409
  • Format: Paperback

Comments

Teresa Proença Aug 17, 2019 - 17:29 PM
"Um verdadeiro amante da literatura devia ser de certo modo como um examinador honesto, preparado para dar a nota mais alta a uma exposição completa, apropriada e bem documentada de ideias das quais não compartilha ou que inclusive abomina."Senhor Lewis, não lhe dou a nota mais alta porque, ou não sou uma verdadeira amante da literatura, ou não sou uma examinadora honesta. No entanto, foi um grande prazer conhecê-lo. Gosto muito da sua conclusão sobre os anseios do ser humano em ir além [...]
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Samir Rawas Sarayji Aug 17, 2019 - 17:29 PM
This is partially a review and partially a reflection. I expect on my second reading to expand on the review part of it, but for now, it has inspired me to put some personal thoughts together regarding how I read.In C.S. Lewis’ book An Experiment in Criticism, I found a thread of thought that was both engaging and insightful where he proposed a thought experiment involving literary criticism.Lewis suggests that books should be judged by how they are read rather than how they are written, and t [...]
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Jesse Aug 17, 2019 - 17:29 PM
Another good example as to why it's a shame C.S. Lewis has been largely abandoned to the realm of religious studies--I can't imagine many non-religious literary critics would bother touching this now. In a lot of ways this is a proto-text for Reader Response theory, with Lewis exploring why making a distinction between what is "good" literature and what is "bad" literature is less important than analyzing the person reading it (which he breaks into the "literary" and "unliterary"). Of course the [...]
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Brenden Link Aug 17, 2019 - 17:29 PM
If you haven't read anything on literary criticism, this little book by C.S. Lewis will open your mind to a whole new world -- the world of the text, and it well-read. Lewis suggests that rather than judging the quality of books by their mere nature and/or content, one should judge them by the nature in which they are read. For example, some people read books only once to gratify some curiosity or lust, only to abandon the books forever afterwards. Contrarily, those who truly love their books wi [...]
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Jasmine Aug 17, 2019 - 17:29 PM
"But in reading great literature I become a thousand men and yet remain myself"C.S. Lewis, 'An Experiment in Criticism', (p.141)"Those of us who have been true readers all our life seldom fully realise the enormous extension of our being which we owe to authors. We realise it best when we talk with an unliterary friend. He may be full of goodness and good sense but he inhabits a tiny world. In it, we should be suffocated. The man who is contented to be only himself, and therefore less a self, is [...]
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John Aug 17, 2019 - 17:29 PM
Yup. I liked it. Like most of Lewis' books, he says more in 140 pages than most do in 300. But I suppose he also looks deeply into little to produce much. When most are raking leaves and combing grass, Lewis is 20 feet deep and analyzing roots.
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Douglas Wilson Aug 17, 2019 - 17:29 PM
Great. And finished yet another time in November of 2017.
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Susan Budd Aug 17, 2019 - 17:29 PM
I could listen to Professor Lewis talk about books for hours.
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Nick Aug 17, 2019 - 17:29 PM
There are elements of this book that I really enjoyed, but there were also a great many parts in which I felt like a freshman in a doctoral level class.I can't say that I fully grasp all aspects of his argument. The parts that I did understand, however, where interesting. I definitely need to revisit this.
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David Aug 17, 2019 - 17:29 PM
How do you, or should you, read a book? Often we criticize books by saying some are good and some are bad. So if you are someone who likes a "bad" book, the rest of us can condescendingly look down on you (such as those of you who like Twilight). Lewis argues that this is wrong, that we should think more about how one reads. His criticisms often hit close to home. He argues that many read when they are bored or just to pass the time. Such persons read to get to the event, to get the gist of the [...]
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Amy Edwards Aug 17, 2019 - 17:29 PM
I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book, even though I realize that I probably don't have the categories in my mind (yet) to fully understand Lewis here. This is not exactly a book review, but a book reaction. Am I a literary reader? I hope so, but I probably have a long way to go. Lewis says, "We love to hear exactly how others enjoy what we enjoy ourselves." This explains why it is so much fun to read what critics or bloggers or other reviewers have to say about books. And even though it is fu [...]
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Bruce Aug 17, 2019 - 17:29 PM
In this book Lewis proposes to critique readers and types of reading, leaving the distinction between books themselves as a corollary to the primary experiment. Here are a couple of quotations that struck me: “The first demand any work of any art makes upon us is surrender. Look. Listen. Receive. Get yourself out of the way….The distinction can hardly be better expressed than by saying that the many use art and the few receive it.” After describing the reading habits of the “unliterary [...]
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Sharon Barrow Wilfong Aug 17, 2019 - 17:29 PM
An Experiment in Criticism is a series of essays that C.S. Lewis wrote about the habits of reading: why does one read, to what purpose does one read and what kind of taste does one possess that motivates a person to read one sort of book instead of another.What I like best about Lewis is his ability to perfectly express how I feel about something. I tend to struggle to find the right words to fully communicate to myself and to others what it is I mean to say or feel about a subject. If I read Le [...]
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Jennifer Aug 17, 2019 - 17:29 PM
It is a true pity that George Orwell and C.S. Lewis never happened to get drunk at the same bar and enter into a violent, gin-fueled debate over literary criticism, because that might have changed the course of the development of literature in the 20th century. Or perhaps it would only have made the bartender rich selling tickets to the show. Sadly, we'll never know.Lewis' radical proposition here is that it is as much the reader as the text which determines whether a book is "good" or "bad" lit [...]
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Michael Perkins Aug 17, 2019 - 17:29 PM
“An unliterary man may be defined as one who reads books once only. . . . We do not enjoy a story fully at the first reading. Not till the curiosity, the sheer narrative lust, has been given its sop and laid asleep, are we at leisure to savour the real beauties. Till then, it is like wasting great wine on a ravenous natural thirst which merely wants cold wetness.” (C.S. Lewis)
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Clem Severino Aug 17, 2019 - 17:29 PM
Acabo de terminar este libro que más bien es un ensayo experimental de C. S. Lewis en donde nos propone cambiar el canon a la hora de juzgar una lectura. En vez de emitir el juicio sobre la obra, él propone emitir el juicio sobre el lector y clasificarlo de lector malo o bueno.Según Lewis, los malos lectores son fácilmente identificables como aquellos que son volubles a la hora de tomar un libro y con la misma facilidad soltarlo. No suelen leer bien, usan solo los ojos (captando sólo lo que [...]
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Cheri Aug 17, 2019 - 17:29 PM
I realize this book was written 50 years ago, but I still find passages like these simply unforgivable:"We have all known women who remembered a novel so dimly that they had to stand for half an hour in the library skimming through it before they were certain they had once read it. But the moment they became certain, they rejected it immediately. . . . Those who read great works, on the other hand, will read the same work ten, twenty or thirty times during the course o their life.""And unhappily [...]
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Brian Aug 17, 2019 - 17:29 PM
"Those of us who have been true readers all our life seldom fully realize the enormous extension of our being which we owe to authors. We realize it best when we talk with an unliterary friend. He may be full of goodness and good sense but he inhabits a tiny world. In it, we should be suffocated. The man who is contented to be only himself, and therefore less a self, is in prison. My own eyes are not enough for me, I will see through those of others . . . Literary experience heals the wound, wit [...]
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Brent Jones Aug 17, 2019 - 17:29 PM
Why read? C.S. Lewis says because it is a hedonistic pleasure and it is "good". "Good" for Lewis does not mean the subject matter is true or even logical but dependent on individual need. In the first chapter he compares buying a book to someone who buys a picture. The need can be very different from one person to the next. One might buy the picture to cover a bare spot on the wall and then after a week or two the pictures become mostly invisible to them. The good news is that the bare spot is n [...]
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Carl Aug 17, 2019 - 17:29 PM
Expressing his distaste for much of contemporary Literary Criticim, Lewis attempts an exploration of what reading is, what it does, and why literature should be given back to the readers.
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Emily Aug 17, 2019 - 17:29 PM
Although parts of the book felt slow, the epilogue made it all worth it, and I hope to return to this book someday. In the meantime, Lewis's words about literature will be kept in mind as I read, especially since I've been trying to make peace with the fact that I'll just never get to all the books and re-readings that I'd like to.
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Courtney Johnston Aug 17, 2019 - 17:29 PM
I think this may be the first book of literary criticism I've read, and I only picked it up because I'm at the beginning of what feels like a bit of a C.S. Lewis binge (his biography 'Surprised by Joy' is by my elbow as I write this).'An Experiment in Criticism' is just that - a lengthy essay in which Lewis tests out a different way of writing about books, and in particular, distinguishing good books from bad. It opens:"In this essay. I propose to try an experiment. Literary criticism is traditi [...]
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Christopher Aug 17, 2019 - 17:29 PM
Wonderful. Anybody who loves reading should become intimately familiar with this book. Full of gems tied together with a tight thesis about what constitutes right reading.
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James F Aug 17, 2019 - 17:29 PM
C.S. Lewis is an intelligent and perceptive critic, and this book is well worth reading. He proposes the "experiment" of considering the way readers read a certain book (or are "invited" to read it), rather than the text as such, as a way of "evaluating" a work, thus becoming a "precursor" of today's "reader response" criticism, and anticipating a principal concern of writers such as Calvino and Eco.The main objection I had to the book is that his examination of ways of reading is very normative [...]
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Tawny Aug 17, 2019 - 17:29 PM
Much to my surprise, I enjoyed reading An Experiment in Criticism. Then again, I am a humanities minor, so anything dealing with art in general is of interest to me. I really appreciated how C.S. Lewis wrote about reading, music, myths, poetry, and paintings. I think he covered his bases well and did not favor any art form. Unlike many other literary critics, Lewis made his points logical and easy to understand. The terminology he used to argue his position was also decipherable. It was a great [...]
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Tori Samar Aug 17, 2019 - 17:29 PM
This definitely just became one of my favorite books about reading books. Lewis's descriptions of the reading "majority" and the reading "few" are excellent; he has put into words what I personally have experienced as a reader and also observed in others. Although I can't yet say that I've learned to read all books as the "few" do, I have done it with some and am now more determined than ever to become a truly good reader. Thanks to Lewis, I now have another compelling paradigm with which to inf [...]
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Kevin Aug 17, 2019 - 17:29 PM
As a reader, I found this book refreshing and thought provoking! It presented a new (to me) view of how to read, of how to receive literature. I am looking forward to re-reading this book as part of my CS Lewis book club this semester. Below are a few excepts from the Epilogue:"Good reading, therefore, though it is not essentially an affectional or moral or intellectual activity, has something in common with all three. In love we escape from our self into one other. In the moral sphere, every ac [...]
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Jeff Short Aug 17, 2019 - 17:29 PM
This is a very interesting read. What is a good book? Why should we read it? How should we read it? Lewis gives some good answers. He stated his aim: "If all went ideally well we should end by defining good literature as that which permits, invites, or even compels good reading; and bad, as that which does the same for bad reading." He asserts a good book is art, to be received and there is greater benefit than the experience or the event.He wrote, "This, so far as I can see, is the specific val [...]
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Michael Aug 17, 2019 - 17:29 PM
One of the best books on literature, and on art in general, I've ever read. Lewis' first rule in his approach to criticism is that we “surrender. Look. Listen. Receive. Get yourself out of the way. (There is no good asking first whether the work before you deserves such a surrender, for until you have surrendered you cannot possibly find out.)” His basic approach to literary criticism is a reversal of that which is normal: instead of judging books as "good" or "bad", and making assumptions a [...]
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Readnponder Aug 17, 2019 - 17:29 PM
Many of us think of C. S. Lewis as a Christian apologist or as creator of Narnia. But he had a "day job" that occupied much of his time -- teaching English at Oxford and later at Cambridge. An Experiment in Criticism is the last of Lewis's academic works, published in 1961. The "experiment" referenced in the title is Lewis's proposal that we judge books by the way people read them. Focus on what constitutes good reading, rather than the elements of a good book. Professor Bruce Edwards refers to [...]
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An Experiment in Criticism By C.S. Lewis Why do we read literature and how do we judge it C.S Lewis s classic analysis springs from the conviction that literature exists for the joy of the reader and that books should be judged by the kind of reading they invite Crucial to his notion of judging literature is a commitment to laying aside expectations and values extraneous to the work, in order to approach it wiWhy do we read literature and how do we judge it C.S Lewis s classic analysis springs from the conviction that literature exists for the joy of the reader and that books should be judged by the kind of reading they invite Crucial to his notion of judging literature is a commitment to laying aside expectations and values extraneous to the work, in order to approach it with an open mind.

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    Published :2019-05-23T17:29:21+00:00