The Best American Science Writing 2007
Gina Kolata Jesse Cohen
[PDF] Ä Free Read ✓ The Best American Science Writing 2007 : by Gina Kolata Jesse Cohen ↠
Jan 25, 2020 - 12:03 PM By Gina Kolata Jesse Cohen

Provocative and engaging, this collection brings together the premiere science writing of the year Featuring the imprimatur of bestselling author and New York Times reporter Gina Kolata, one of the nation s foremost voices in science and medicine, and with contributions from Atul Gawande, Elizabeth Kolbert, and Oliver Sacks, among others, The Best American Science WritingProvocative and engaging, this collection brings together the premiere science writing of the year Featuring the imprimatur of bestselling author and New York Times reporter Gina Kolata, one of the nation s foremost voices in science and medicine, and with contributions from Atul Gawande, Elizabeth Kolbert, and Oliver Sacks, among others, The Best American Science Writing 2007 is a compelling anthology of our most advanced, and most relevant, scientific inquiries.
  • Title: The Best American Science Writing 2007
  • Author: Gina Kolata Jesse Cohen
  • ISBN: 9780061345777
  • Page: 442
  • Format: Paperback

Comments

Terri Ann Jan 25, 2020 - 12:03 PM
Excellente. Fascinating science articles and essays on a wide variety of topics from a wide variety of publications. Loved it! I found, though, that I'm done reading global warming articles. I realized that I enjoy science reading because I like learning something new, or novel, or that shifts a paradigm. The global warming articles in this collection did none of that for me. I also skipped the article about functional MRI studies on how the human brain works when it thinks about money and inves [...]
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Cynthia Jan 25, 2020 - 12:03 PM
Do not be put off by the title of this book. It is very readable and interesting to non-scientists. It includes the best science articles from not only science-related publications, but also general interest magazines such as "The New Yorker". The variety of information on the brain alone is worth the cost of the book. There are also several very informative articles about climate change and what we do and don't really know about it. All in all it is a great summer or anytime read. I would recom [...]
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Megan Jan 25, 2020 - 12:03 PM
This isn't my favorite edition of this anthology, but while I could have done with less medical articles (personal preference), there were quite a few unique and engaging pieces in this collection. My favorites and the ones I found most thought-provoking:"Manifold Destiny," by Sylvia Nasar and David Gruber, originally published in THE NEW YORKER, about the unintended controversy surrounding the Russian mathematician Grigori Perelman's proof of the Poincaré conjecture, and the consequences of th [...]
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Mark Jan 25, 2020 - 12:03 PM
This is a strong collection. Perhaps reflecting editor Gina Kolata's preferences, it leans heavily towards brain science, medical and environmental topics, and has fewer pieces on the hard sciences or technology.My only other small criticism is that I think she chose a couple of the pieces because they were written by her New York Times pals rather than because they merited it, particularly a rather dull story by Lawrence Altman about how doctors peformed an aortic aneurysm repair invented by fa [...]
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David Jan 25, 2020 - 12:03 PM
I thought this year's volume was quite a bit better than usual - hence the fourth star. The selection is distinctly skewed in favor of various neurological topics, with relatively fewer environmental and ecological pieces, but the high quality of the results vindicates the chosen emphasis, in my view. Among the topics covered:• neurological research pertaining to:- lie detection - face recognition - stereoscopic vision - Alzheimer's disease - depression - financial decision-making• new surgi [...]
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Alex Telander Jan 25, 2020 - 12:03 PM
BEST AMERICAN SCIENCE WRITING 2007 EDITED BY GINA KOLATA: Since this is the “best American science writing” of the year, you know it’s going to be good. What’s amazing is the variety of subject matter that just the term “science” covers. The result is a collection of incredible articles covering the latest discoveries and breakthroughs in the many different fields of science.While this collection may not be for the average person who has little-to-no knowledge of science – some bac [...]
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Eleanor With Cats Jan 25, 2020 - 12:03 PM
"The Theory of Everything" - Tyler Cabot"Manifold Destiny" - Sylvia Nasar & David Gruber"Looking for the Lie" - Robin Marantz Henig"Face Blind" - Joshua Davis"Stereo Sue" - Oliver SacksA woman regains her depth perception."Probing a Mind for a Cure" - Stacey BurlingDissecting donated brains for Alzheimer's research."A Depression Switch?" - David DobbsCan an operation turn off depression? "With Lasers and Daring, Doctors Race to Save a Young Man's Brain" - Denise Grady"Being There" - Jerome G [...]
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Jenny Jan 25, 2020 - 12:03 PM
What makes for good science writing? This is a question that editors of the Best American Science Writing tackle every year. In 2006 Atul Gawande, surgeon and writer, asserted that the best science writing achieves the 'coolness' factor, that prose which makes technical and complex topics exciting and accessible to a broad audience. Writing styles that speak to the work-a-day person, word craft that seamlessly translates unfamiliar concepts to even the most casual reader. This year Gina Kolata, [...]
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Modern Hermeneut Jan 25, 2020 - 12:03 PM
With the recent profusion of Best American collections, the series is at risk of becoming diluted. To make matters worse, there are now separate collections for "Science and Nature Writing" and "Science Writing" (even though the former includes essays that are NOT nature-related, and the latter includes essays that ARE). Is there enough quality American writing to go around?Apparently, yes. But the New Yorker is definitely carrying the load -- no less than seven pieces in this collection come fr [...]
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Sam Jan 25, 2020 - 12:03 PM
You can't beat good science writing, and in case you fell behind on your Times, Times Magazine, and New Yorker reading--almost every piece in this volume originally appeared in one of those--this is a good way to catch up. It's a pretty good survey of the most important scientific and medical fronteirs: genomics, neuroscience, and particle physics; but it also, as was the editor's stated intention, humanizes science by focusing on the personalities involved. We get quirky mathematicians, loner p [...]
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Beth Jan 25, 2020 - 12:03 PM
I enjoy these "Best Writing" collections a lot. One of the highlights of this year's edition was a piece written by Atul Gawande about the Apgar score, which was wonderful. Gawande is a very interesting person and a great writer. I really enjoyed his book "Complications", and look forward to reading more from him in the future. He writes about medicine and health care with wonderful honesty and humanity. There was also a piece by Oliver Sacks, who is amazing; I have loved all of his books. Also, [...]
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Joan Jan 25, 2020 - 12:03 PM
This book is a collection of previously published non-fiction science stories, including the story of Dr. Michael DeBakey's aortic aneurysm that he suffered when he was 97 years old and its subsequent repair. This particular story covered some of the technical issues that were of interest because I was reading this book just as news of Richard Holbrook's death was published. Dr. DeBakey's story also touched on issues of ethics - he had previously given direction not to perform the surgery that w [...]
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Dhaval Thakkar Jan 25, 2020 - 12:03 PM
Some really good science articles.ough I only got it for two medical articles by Dr. Jerome Groopman and Dr. Atul Gawande. Finally learned something about String Theory and the relation to Quantum Mechanics.Some of the articles are drawn out and not so interesting but overall I have enjoyed the majority of the articles so far. After finishing the book my verdict is that I came for the medical articles and stayed for the rest. Turns out the articles involving other scientific principles were much [...]
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Holmes Jan 25, 2020 - 12:03 PM
If one wants to read up on the latest scientific discoveries (and be able to understand them), nothing is better than reading a collection of the latest science essays, all superbly written by eloquent writers. These essays inform and intrigue at the same time. Time to get the 2008 book! Personal favourites: Stacey Burling on Alzheimer's - Probing a Mind for a CureJennifer Couzin on falsifying data - Truth and ConsequencesLawrence K. Altman on 98-year-old Michael DeBakey, who survived an operati [...]
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Erin Jan 25, 2020 - 12:03 PM
Pretty hit or miss articlesI really enjoyed the articles on "the theory of everything", the guy who solved the Poincare conjecture, the intelligent design debate, the movement of species following global warming, the debate over the cause of global warming, finding organic tissue in dinosaur bones, and "molecular gastronomy"; but the other articles were, I guess, not my kind of science. I don't care much about medical discoveries or how the brain works, tsk tsk, and that's what the rest of them [...]
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Rosemary Lerit Titievsky Jan 25, 2020 - 12:03 PM
I enjoyed this collection much better than last year's. I did skip Kolbert's and Broad's respective pieces - I need a long break from the global warming debates unless they're strikingly different. I also passed over Gawande's "The Score" having read "Better", in which it appears, and having just re-read this very essay (given to me by my obgyn)right before I got to it in the series. I did happily re-read the piece on Face Blindness. Fascinating. The biggest standout for me, however, was Matthew [...]
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Karen Jan 25, 2020 - 12:03 PM
This was a good read. My favorites are "God or Gorilla," "Truth and Consequences," and "Schweitzer's Dangerous Discovery." In all three it was the characters that pulled me in, though of course the science was interesting as well. "Cooking for Eggheads" is fun, though I don't think I'll ever be able to cook an egg without feeling ashamed by my lack of molecular gastronomical technique.I didn't read all the articles, just because the content of some didn't appeal to me. Overall, it is quite worth [...]
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Meter Jan 25, 2020 - 12:03 PM
Not to be missed. The New Yorker article about the semi-scandal surrounding the Poincare Conjecture solution is worth the check-out alone. Quite exciting and nice glimpse on the reality of academia w/r/t mathematics.This edition is not short on fluff, but this is fine with me. Also especially fun to read is the article about the Hollywood scientist. Some of the old territory in physics is blasted through in the standard pop-science way - always the GUT and string theory and really?!.
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Sara Jan 25, 2020 - 12:03 PM
Definitely going to reread this one! It is so cool to see a conglomeration of all of the great things going on in science during 2007 and the journalists really do a nice job of giving sufficient background information and a history of how the scientists got to the point that they're at in their research. The selection of the pieces in this anthology is very diverse, ranging from dinosaurs to brain science with climate change developments as icing and molecular gastronomy for sprinkles so you'll [...]
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Mazola1 Jan 25, 2020 - 12:03 PM
This one isn't quite as good as some others in the series, but a number of the articles are well written and about fascinaing subjects, everything from dinosaur tissue preserved for millions of years to cutting edge technology. It was a bit too heavily weighted with medical centered stories. Particularly interesting was the article about the invention machine, which generates investions using a sort of natural selection type of program.
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Katie M. Jan 25, 2020 - 12:03 PM
I do love reading good science writing, and the articles in this collection all qualify. Some made me say "whoa," some made me laugh, and some simply left me with the satisfied feeling of understanding the world a little bit better. My one complaint is that I felt there was a disproportionate number of articles about brains (neuroscience, psychology, etc.). I brains are fascinating, but there is so much else going on in science, so more breadth might have been nice.
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Naomi Jan 25, 2020 - 12:03 PM
Not as boring as it sounds, kind of an overview of current events in science but each with an interesting hook such as medical ethics. A few pieces were about neuroscience, evolution, genetics, and even economics and cooking. This book is a fascinating read and you don't need to have a science background to understand the articles. I learned something from every story and the writing is really good.
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Kathleen Jan 25, 2020 - 12:03 PM
I pick up the Best American Science and Best American Science and Nature writing each year. I was a bit disappointed this year - not because of the caliber of writing, but because I had already read a significant proportion of the articles. As always, a great way to get a sampling of some of the best science (and writing) going on in the world each year.
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Cori Jan 25, 2020 - 12:03 PM
Fascinating articles about the research and discoveries in many fields of science. My favorites include "Looking for the Lie" which is about the implications of being able to tell if someone is lying; "Face Blind," which is about people who cannot remember faces, even their own; and "Cooking for Eggheads" which reveals the science behind practice.
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cmo Jan 25, 2020 - 12:03 PM
In this book, I learned that the inventor of the polygraph (lie detector) was the same person who created Wonder Woman - that's why she has the Lasso of Truth. This is an eclectic collection of what really is great writing about some of the most interesting science advancements and questions of the year.
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Kim Jan 25, 2020 - 12:03 PM
The science writing portion of this series is always fun. This particular installment included some great stuff, including an invention machine! But it was a bit heavy on cringe-inducing hospital fare--you know, childbirth, aneurysms, and the like. If you aren't as much of a hypochondriac as I am, it probably isn't so bad.
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Kate Jan 25, 2020 - 12:03 PM
I always enjoy the Best American Science and the Best American Science and Nature Writing series. This one is, so far, slightly less impressive, though not in subject matter but in the weird pattern of lame endings to the essays. The second essay, however, on the controversy in the mathematics world about who really proved Fermat's Last Theorem, rocked my socks.
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Joslyn Jan 25, 2020 - 12:03 PM
the first few essays were a little dense & kind of what you'd expect of 'science writing,' but there were many really engaging, accessible, interesting articles on a good range of topics in this collection.
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Jordan Jan 25, 2020 - 12:03 PM
With the exception of a few yawners, i loved this book. Really great sample of accessible science writing the editor had a clear penchant for a few topics that recurred throughout the stories, but they were mostly excellent.
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Blanca Jan 25, 2020 - 12:03 PM
This book is a collection of scientific articles in 2007. The articles are very interesting and worth reading. This would be a great book for article review for teachers how have their student read and review articles.
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The Best American Science Writing 2007 By Gina Kolata Jesse Cohen Provocative and engaging, this collection brings together the premiere science writing of the year Featuring the imprimatur of bestselling author and New York Times reporter Gina Kolata, one of the nation s foremost voices in science and medicine, and with contributions from Atul Gawande, Elizabeth Kolbert, and Oliver Sacks, among others, The Best American Science WritingProvocative and engaging, this collection brings together the premiere science writing of the year Featuring the imprimatur of bestselling author and New York Times reporter Gina Kolata, one of the nation s foremost voices in science and medicine, and with contributions from Atul Gawande, Elizabeth Kolbert, and Oliver Sacks, among others, The Best American Science Writing 2007 is a compelling anthology of our most advanced, and most relevant, scientific inquiries.

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  • [PDF] Ä Free Read ✓ The Best American Science Writing 2007 : by Gina Kolata Jesse Cohen ↠
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    Posted by:Gina Kolata Jesse Cohen
    Published :2019-03-25T12:03:32+00:00