[PDF] Download ☆ The Empire That Would Not Die: The Paradox of Eastern Roman Survival, 640-740 | by ✓ John F. Haldon
Apr 05, 2020 - 14:11 PM By John F. Haldon

The eastern Roman Empire was the largest state in western Eurasia in the sixth century Only a century later, it was a fraction of its former size Surrounded by enemies, ravaged by warfare and disease, the empire seemed destined to collapse Yet it did not die In this holistic analysis, John Haldon elucidates the factors that allowed the eastern Roman Empire to survive aThe eastern Roman Empire was the largest state in western Eurasia in the sixth century Only a century later, it was a fraction of its former size Surrounded by enemies, ravaged by warfare and disease, the empire seemed destined to collapse Yet it did not die In this holistic analysis, John Haldon elucidates the factors that allowed the eastern Roman Empire to survive against all odds into the eighth century.By 700 CE the empire had lost three quarters of its territory to the Islamic caliphate But the rugged geography of its remaining territories in Anatolia and the Aegean was strategically advantageous, preventing enemies from permanently occupying imperial towns and cities while leaving them vulnerable to Roman counterattacks The the empire shrank, the it became centered around the capital of Constantinople, whose ability to withstand siege after siege proved decisive Changes in climate also played a role, permitting shifts in agricultural production that benefitted the imperial economy.At the same time, the crisis confronting the empire forced the imperial court, the provincial ruling classes, and the church closer together State and church together embodied a sacralized empire that held the emperor, not the patriarch, as Christendom s symbolic head Despite its territorial losses, the empire suffered no serious political rupture What remained became the heartland of a medieval Christian Roman state, with a powerful political theology that predicted the emperor would eventually prevail against God s enemies and establish Orthodox Christianity s world dominion.
  • Title: The Empire That Would Not Die: The Paradox of Eastern Roman Survival, 640-740
  • Author: John F. Haldon
  • ISBN: 9780674088771
  • Page: 206
  • Format: Hardcover

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David Usharauli Apr 05, 2020 - 14:11 PM
This book tries to explain how the eastern Roman Empire also known as Byzantium managed to survive the Arab invasions between 640 and 740 A.D. By 640 A.D. after prolonged but ultimately victorious war with Persians Byzantines under the emperor Heraclius recovered all the eastern territories lost previously to Persia. However, both empires were quite exhausted from constant warring. It was at this time that tribes from Arabian peninsula became united under the new faith called Islam and started a [...]
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Ryan Denson Apr 05, 2020 - 14:11 PM
Haldon's book attempts to tackle a simple, yet monumentally challenging question. Given the myriad existential challenges facing the Byzantine empire in the seventh century, how did the empire manage to hold on? In the introduction, Haldon notes five sets of factors that may have contributed to the survival of the Byzantine polity: "The role of beliefs and identity, the nature of the empire's elites, strategic geography, climate and environment, and organizational factors." These factors are the [...]
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The Empire That Would Not Die: The Paradox of Eastern Roman Survival, 640-740 By John F. Haldon The eastern Roman Empire was the largest state in western Eurasia in the sixth century Only a century later, it was a fraction of its former size Surrounded by enemies, ravaged by warfare and disease, the empire seemed destined to collapse Yet it did not die In this holistic analysis, John Haldon elucidates the factors that allowed the eastern Roman Empire to survive aThe eastern Roman Empire was the largest state in western Eurasia in the sixth century Only a century later, it was a fraction of its former size Surrounded by enemies, ravaged by warfare and disease, the empire seemed destined to collapse Yet it did not die In this holistic analysis, John Haldon elucidates the factors that allowed the eastern Roman Empire to survive against all odds into the eighth century.By 700 CE the empire had lost three quarters of its territory to the Islamic caliphate But the rugged geography of its remaining territories in Anatolia and the Aegean was strategically advantageous, preventing enemies from permanently occupying imperial towns and cities while leaving them vulnerable to Roman counterattacks The the empire shrank, the it became centered around the capital of Constantinople, whose ability to withstand siege after siege proved decisive Changes in climate also played a role, permitting shifts in agricultural production that benefitted the imperial economy.At the same time, the crisis confronting the empire forced the imperial court, the provincial ruling classes, and the church closer together State and church together embodied a sacralized empire that held the emperor, not the patriarch, as Christendom s symbolic head Despite its territorial losses, the empire suffered no serious political rupture What remained became the heartland of a medieval Christian Roman state, with a powerful political theology that predicted the emperor would eventually prevail against God s enemies and establish Orthodox Christianity s world dominion.

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  • [PDF] Download ☆ The Empire That Would Not Die: The Paradox of Eastern Roman Survival, 640-740 | by ✓ John F. Haldon
    206 John F. Haldon
  • thumbnail Title: [PDF] Download ☆ The Empire That Would Not Die: The Paradox of Eastern Roman Survival, 640-740 | by ✓ John F. Haldon
    Posted by:John F. Haldon
    Published :2020-01-17T14:11:05+00:00