Best Download [Colson Whitehead] ✓ The Noble Hustle: Poker, Beef Jerky, and Death || [Christian Book] PDF ↠
Jul 20, 2019 - 13:20 PM By Colson Whitehead

The Noble Hustle is Pulitzer finalist Colson Whitehead s hilarious memoir of his search for meaning at high stakes poker tables, which the author describes as Eat, Pray, Love for depressed shut ins On one level, The Noble Hustle is a familiar species of participatory journalism a longtime neighborhood poker player, Whitehead was given a 10,000 stake and an assignmentThe Noble Hustle is Pulitzer finalist Colson Whitehead s hilarious memoir of his search for meaning at high stakes poker tables, which the author describes as Eat, Pray, Love for depressed shut ins On one level, The Noble Hustle is a familiar species of participatory journalism a longtime neighborhood poker player, Whitehead was given a 10,000 stake and an assignment from the online online magazine Grantland to see how far he could get in the World Series of Poker But since it stems from the astonishing mind of Colson Whitehead MacArthur Award endorsed , the book is a brilliant, hilarious, weirdly profound, and ultimately moving portrayal of yes, it sounds overblown and ridiculous, but really the human condition After weeks of preparation that included repeated bus trips to glamorous Atlantic City, and hiring a personal trainer to toughen him up for sitting at twelve hours a stretch, the author journeyed to the gaudy wonderland that is Las Vegas the world s greatest Leisure Industrial Complex to try his luck in the multi million dollar tournament Hobbled by his mediocre playing skills and a lifelong condition known as anhedonia the inability to experience pleasure Whitehead did not spoiler alert win tens of millions of dollars But he did chronicle his progress, both literal and existential, in this unbelievably funny, uncannily accurate social satire whose main target is the author himself Whether you ve been playing cards your whole life, or have never picked up a hand, you re sure to agree that this book contains some of the best writing about beef jerky ever put to paper.
  • Title: The Noble Hustle: Poker, Beef Jerky, and Death
  • Author: Colson Whitehead
  • ISBN: 9780385537056
  • Page: 202
  • Format: Hardcover

Comments

lorinbocol Jul 20, 2019 - 13:20 PM
prendi un intellettuale newyorkese con la usuale ironia in dotazione, e buttalo nel mezzo di un addestramento tra casinò e gioco d'azzardo. ne esce questa originale opera dalle parti del reportage, che mi ha accompagnato trasversalmente per circa un mese. una sconclusionata frequentazione che, a dispetto delle aspettative sul tema, mi lascia mediamente soddisfattaima di tutto perché colson whitehead scrive francamente bene: il washington post l'ha definito tom wolfe incrociato con thomas pynch [...]
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Ami Jul 20, 2019 - 13:20 PM
While poker has never really been my thing, Colson Whitehead's writing has always *very* much been my thing. So it is surprising to me that I missed sections of this book, which were originally published on Grantland. I should go to that website more often. Anytime Whitehead is at a poker table, or talking to one of his poker mentors, this book is on fire. One of his "instructors," known just as Coach, especially spoke to me. A woman in her 60s who exploits sweater sets and pearl earrings for se [...]
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Kate Jul 20, 2019 - 13:20 PM
Overall, pretty fantastic, but I want to talk about it in context with this completely unrelated book about creative nonfiction, the thesis of which is that it's okay to fabricate parts of your nonfiction to make it interesting, because otherwise no one will read or remember it, and oblivion does no great service to The Truth. Instead of a-factual embellishment, Whitehead uses personality. (And a constant stream of decorative twitches that are obviously for comedy, but still help to set the scen [...]
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Melissa Klug Jul 20, 2019 - 13:20 PM
Although I admit I would read absolutely anything Colson Whitehead writes, when I picked this book off a very deep TBR pile, I said, poker? Really? I'm doomed with this book. I know absolutely nothing about poker--in fact, I have to think really hard to name all four suits of cards (card playing wasn't A Thing in my house when I was growing up, and I have never had an affinity for card games. Every summer on in-law vacation my MIL gets very annoyed when I choose to sit on the couch and read inst [...]
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Ben Jul 20, 2019 - 13:20 PM
"Eat, Pray, Love for depressed shut-ins" is the self-applied description of this relentlessly self-aware, self-loathing tract covering mostly poker, with forays into beef jerky, death, and other topics of pressing interest. Colson Whitehead casts himself as sad-sack-in-chief, bringing us along on his explorations of some of America's most notable sad-sack ports of call, like Atlantic City, Vegas, and the New York Port Authority bus station. All the while, he's preparing (after a fashion) to play [...]
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Taryn Pierson Jul 20, 2019 - 13:20 PM
I really enjoyed Colson Whitehead's memoir about the time he spent playing in the World Series of Poker, but almost a month after finishing it, I'm having a hell of a time articulating why. Whitehead freely admits he isn't that great of a poker player—his greatest advantage seems to be his deadpan expression, a hard-to-read poker face he presents to the world all the time, not just at the card table. When a magazine agreed to bankroll his entry fee in the tournament, he wasn't in a great place [...]
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Ms.pegasus Jul 20, 2019 - 13:20 PM
Among the 6864 entries to the main event of the 2011 World Series of Poker was author Colson Whitehead. His gig was courtesy of GRANTLAND magazine. This book, like the articles from which it was spawned, reads like a diverse series of essays about the author's life-long relationship to poker, his preparations for the event, and the changing face of Las Vegas.He recalls the game from his college days, and a memorable 1991 road trip to Las Vegas. In that year there were a mere 215 Main Event entra [...]
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Joshua Jul 20, 2019 - 13:20 PM
This might be an unpopular opinion [all the accolades and awards it is getting puts me on a limb with my opinion] but the only reason I got through this annoying book by Colson Whitehead was that it was short. I have attempted to read Whitehead before and always stop in frustration regarding his over-written, trying too hard styled that is the same with this bit of non-fiction about poker. Whitehead's nowhere near as humorous as he believes he is [I find him terribly unfunny] as he goes on endle [...]
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Sara Mazzoni Jul 20, 2019 - 13:20 PM
Nel 2011, lo scrittore americano Colson Whitehead viene inviato dal magazine Grantland alle World Series of Poker. L’obiettivo del giornale è fargli scrivere un reportage. Whitehead è un appassionato di poker, ma soltanto a un livello amatoriale: non conosce la teoria, gioca male in modo intuitivo a casa con gli amici. Non ha mai partecipato a un torneo. Grantland gli paga la quota di partecipazione (10.000 dollari), le altre spese sono a carico di Whitehead ma potrà tenersi quello che vinc [...]
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Fred Forbes Jul 20, 2019 - 13:20 PM
Mom always said profanity is evidence of a limited vocabulary which may be why I am sensitive to it. Not that it does not have a place in writing and in life, but Whitehead, like many Millennial writers tends to use it as casual adverbs and adjectives and this overuse becomes wearing as you move through the pages. The book itself seems a bit forced. I found out that it is an "expansion" of a magazine article and feels like it. A title that would have worked is "But I digress " since he leads us [...]
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Mac Jul 20, 2019 - 13:20 PM
Point 1. Saw a photo of Colson Whitehead beaming with an engaging, broad smile, and I was stunned. Based on The Noble Hustle, I figured he hadn't ever smiled. Throughout the book, he is discouraged and dour. In the opening sentence, he says he is "half dead inside," and he goes on to admit he lives in the land where there's the "inability to experience pleasure." Now, I hope this depressed attitude is a humorous literary stance he has taken for The Noble Hustle, but it makes for an unpleasant jo [...]
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Maggie Jul 20, 2019 - 13:20 PM
A moment of silence, please, for the wonderful online magazine Grantland, which had some of the smartest sportswriting around. The magazine sent Colson Whitehead on assignment to participate in the World Series of Poker. They didn't pay him for the series of articles that followed, but they covered his $10,000 entry fee to the tournament and told him he could keep whatever he won.This book isn't for everyone. Those hoping for a guide to the World Series of Poker or poker in general will think it [...]
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Bill Breedlove Jul 20, 2019 - 13:20 PM
I like Colson Whitehead's writing and I like poker, and I even like Grantland, so this seemed a no-brainer. It was interesting, but I was not very fulfilled by it. Perhaps I was expecting a more "poker-centric" book, a chronicle of his trying to get ready for, and eventual participation in, the WSOP. Something like, say, POSITIVELY FIFTH STREET by James McManus. That book, like THE NOBLE HUSTLE, weaves personal digressions and outside story angles into the natural arc formed by playing in the WS [...]
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Joe Jul 20, 2019 - 13:20 PM
There are two reasons to read this enhanced special edition Director's Cut of Colson Whitehead's highly regarded Grantland article about his time as the Republic of Anhedonia's official representative at the World Series of Poker. The first is the litany of bizarre truths littered in the twin deserts of Las Vegas and Whitehead's dreams. These will seem familiar, as they were viewable from the original article, but they are worth seeing again, up-close and with ever more excruciating angst. The s [...]
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Ben Rowe Jul 20, 2019 - 13:20 PM
Whitehead is a decent writer and the pages turn easy enough in this short book but ultimately there are many, many books out there that capture both poker and specifically the WSOP more accurately, interestingly and entertainingly.Like a lot of non-fiction this feels puffed out - a noted writer was given the buy in to the main event and spun a book out of it. Its always much better when a book has a story that is compelling or a writer with so much interesting to say that a book is needed to con [...]
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Jessica Woodbury Jul 20, 2019 - 13:20 PM
If you've only read Colson Whitehead's novels, you may not be aware of his deep capacity for deadpan. His novels certainly have plenty of misery and meditation, but they won't have you prepared for this book. The only thing that can adequately prepare you is to start following him on Twitter. Right now. (He's @colsonwhitehead.) He's glorious, one of the best tweeters ever. His tweets are depressing and ridiculous and the funniest things you'll ever read.What's amazing is that he takes the abilit [...]
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Mieke Mcbride Jul 20, 2019 - 13:20 PM
I've only read one other book by Whitehead-- Zone One (arguably his most popular book). Zone One is best described as a boring (but incredibly well-written) zombie book. I saw Whitehead read from The Noble Hustle at BookPeople and found the sections he read amusing so decided to grab this book from the library and give Whitehead a second chance. He's clever and has a way with words, so I was hopeful. Plus this book is short. How dull and slow moving can a short book be? (Sadly, the answer is ver [...]
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Alex Jul 20, 2019 - 13:20 PM
In 2011, Grantland paid novelist Colson Whitehead's entry fee in the World Series of Poker. Whitehead, freshly divorced and perpetually morose, trains for and then attends the World Series, and The Noble Hustle is his account of the experience.Whitehead is depressed. He writes like a witty, gambling addicted Eeyore. His depression is the most enjoyable aspect of the book. You sort of expect him to drop the shtick and flash a little optimism, or express the human emotion of joy, but he never does [...]
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Tristan Jul 20, 2019 - 13:20 PM
Besides my rating being abysmal let me explain what reading this book was like. It's like, you're on a long flight to Vegas and you're intrigued by your soon to be first HUGE gambling experience. Suddenly, some guy sits beside you and says, "Hey, been to Vegas before?"And you say, "Actually this will --""Great kid. Now, let me tell you this story of when I got to play in the World Series of Poker, and lost!"And he goes on telling this pointless and dull story of his time in Vegas for 15 hours. T [...]
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Brad Wojak Jul 20, 2019 - 13:20 PM
Poker has never really been my thing. I have played it, poorly, in garages and at stags. I picked this up solely based on my love of beef jerky, and the other writings of Mr. Whitehead. I was not disappointed. This book is not going to improve your game much, or assist you in being a brighter, happier person. It will however, give you an enjoyable companion for a while and tell you a great story.
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Mike Jul 20, 2019 - 13:20 PM
When your book is described as a "hilarious memoir", you have, I think, a certain standard up to which you should live. Mr. Whitehead fails miserably! Perhaps, "a frequently uninteresting, at times rising to mildly amusing, travelogue cum self-deprecating navel gaze which manages to make the World Series of Poker a bore" would be more accurate.
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Stacy Jul 20, 2019 - 13:20 PM
On one hand, this book is a hot mess--full of jargon, tangents, and the author's own neuroses. On the other hand, I'll read anything Whitehead writes. He's smart, funny, and a master of simile and analogy.
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Mocha Girl Jul 20, 2019 - 13:20 PM
I’ve read Whitehead’s work before and have enjoyed other works more than this offering. I learned little about poker and laughed even less at his antics. I was disappointed -- too much rambling about nothing -- I closed the book wishing I could reclaim the time I lost.
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Emily Jul 20, 2019 - 13:20 PM
Probably closer to 3.5This little book about poker brought me back to the mid-2000s when everyone thought it was possible to be a poker superstar. The writing in this novel was beautiful, which is a weird thing to say about a poker novel, but that's what you get when Colson Whitehead is at the helm. I felt like parts of it came off a bit-try hard and like there was a good deal of padding, but overall it was an enjoyable read with a lot of nostalgia.
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Natalia Jul 20, 2019 - 13:20 PM
I don't even remember the rules of poker, or particularly like it, but he's just so witty it's fun!
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Jessica Jul 20, 2019 - 13:20 PM
First of all, let me just say that I love Colson Whitehead's other books. Sag Harbor is a summer must-read, especially if you're a GenX'er, and Zone One is an intellectual take on apocalyptic literature that I found gripping, thoughtful, thorough, and wry. So of course I jumped at the chance to read Whitehead's memoir about his time as a competitor in the World Series of Poker: The Noble Hustle. At this time, I should probably also admit that although I like to play poker, I've never watched the [...]
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Kim Wong Jul 20, 2019 - 13:20 PM
From the start, I couldn't chase the impression that Colson Whitehead is the kind of author who likes to hear his own voice. I thought his novel, "Zone One," had interesting elements, but it seemed like Whitehead had exhausted his premise within the first 100 pages or so. Thus, it was enlightening to see Whitehead describe his exhaustion after finishing "Zone One" in "The Noble Hustle: Poker, Beef Jerky, and Death," his non-fiction account of his trip to the 2011 World Series of Poker that was s [...]
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Eric T. Voigt Jul 20, 2019 - 13:20 PM
"Yeah, something big went down before I got there. Daddy's drinking again, Gabby got her nethers pierced." That's the metaphor the author decides to go with to describe arriving at a tense table of players. Colson Whitehead is so my kind of sports underdog: sarcastic, literate, and competing in what is only in the loosest sense a sport. I was rooting for him to sweep the World Series of Poker, to take no prisoners, to win win win, as soon as I'd read the opening line: "I have a good poker face b [...]
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Patricia Murphy Jul 20, 2019 - 13:20 PM
Disclaimer: I have no interest in poker. Or perhaps it's even worse than that, I have a mild disdain for it. So I'm not set up to like this book. I put it on my read list because NPR recommended it and I've been wanting to read some Whitehead. And there were a few verbal pratfalls that amused me in that Consider the Lobster way. I loved the Prince lyrics used as transition sentences. But I need you to know, men, that there is absolutely nothing you can do to a play-by-play to make it interesting [...]
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Dale Jul 20, 2019 - 13:20 PM
Since I love poker, I got this book because it deals with the noble game. And I'm glad I did, because Whitehead's book is a great find, at least for me. His wry wit and bizarre journalistic fluctuations are fun, but not for everyone, who won't know what he's talking about half the time. He's like that weird guy on the subway, who may be crazy, or brilliant, or both.The writing style is like Hunter S. Thompson with a dash of Tom Wolfe, underscored by a jazz riff that melds into rap. Through it al [...]
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The Noble Hustle: Poker, Beef Jerky, and Death By Colson Whitehead The Noble Hustle is Pulitzer finalist Colson Whitehead s hilarious memoir of his search for meaning at high stakes poker tables, which the author describes as Eat, Pray, Love for depressed shut ins On one level, The Noble Hustle is a familiar species of participatory journalism a longtime neighborhood poker player, Whitehead was given a 10,000 stake and an assignmentThe Noble Hustle is Pulitzer finalist Colson Whitehead s hilarious memoir of his search for meaning at high stakes poker tables, which the author describes as Eat, Pray, Love for depressed shut ins On one level, The Noble Hustle is a familiar species of participatory journalism a longtime neighborhood poker player, Whitehead was given a 10,000 stake and an assignment from the online online magazine Grantland to see how far he could get in the World Series of Poker But since it stems from the astonishing mind of Colson Whitehead MacArthur Award endorsed , the book is a brilliant, hilarious, weirdly profound, and ultimately moving portrayal of yes, it sounds overblown and ridiculous, but really the human condition After weeks of preparation that included repeated bus trips to glamorous Atlantic City, and hiring a personal trainer to toughen him up for sitting at twelve hours a stretch, the author journeyed to the gaudy wonderland that is Las Vegas the world s greatest Leisure Industrial Complex to try his luck in the multi million dollar tournament Hobbled by his mediocre playing skills and a lifelong condition known as anhedonia the inability to experience pleasure Whitehead did not spoiler alert win tens of millions of dollars But he did chronicle his progress, both literal and existential, in this unbelievably funny, uncannily accurate social satire whose main target is the author himself Whether you ve been playing cards your whole life, or have never picked up a hand, you re sure to agree that this book contains some of the best writing about beef jerky ever put to paper.

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  • Best Download [Colson Whitehead] ✓ The Noble Hustle: Poker, Beef Jerky, and Death || [Christian Book] PDF ↠
    202 Colson Whitehead
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    Published :2019-04-22T13:20:21+00:00