Free Read [Travel Book] Ì Dividing the Spoils: The War for Alexander the Great's Empire - by Robin A.H. Waterfield ¹
Oct 27, 2020 - 23:38 PM By Robin A.H. Waterfield

Alexander the Great conquered an enormous empire stretching from Greece to the Indian subcontinent and his death triggered forty bloody years of world changing events These were years filled with high adventure, intrigue, passion, assassinations, dynastic marriages, treachery, shifting alliances, and mass slaughter on battlefield after battlefield And while the men fouAlexander the Great conquered an enormous empire stretching from Greece to the Indian subcontinent and his death triggered forty bloody years of world changing events These were years filled with high adventure, intrigue, passion, assassinations, dynastic marriages, treachery, shifting alliances, and mass slaughter on battlefield after battlefield And while the men fought on the field, the women, such as Alexander s mother Olympias, schemed from their palaces and pavilions.Dividing the Spoils serves up a fast paced narrative that captures this turbulent time as it revives the memory of the Successors of Alexander and their great contest for his empire The Successors, Robin Waterfield shows, were no mere plunderers Indeed, Alexander left things in great disarray at the time of his death, with no guaranteed succession, no administration in place suitable for such a large realm, and huge untamed areas both bordering and within his empire It was the Successors battle tested companions of Alexander such as Ptolemy, Perdiccas, Seleucus, and Antigonus the One Eyed who consolidated Alexander s gains Their competing ambitions, however, eventually led to the break up of the empire To tell their story in full, Waterfield draws upon a wide range of historical materials, providing the first account that makes complete sense of this highly complex period.Astonishingly, this period of brutal, cynical warfare was also characterized by brilliant cultural achievements, especially in the fields of philosophy, literature, and art A new world emerged from the dust and haze of battle, and, in addition to chronicling political and military events, Waterfield provides ample discussion of the amazing cultural flowering of the early Hellenistic Age.
  • Title: Dividing the Spoils: The War for Alexander the Great's Empire
  • Author: Robin A.H. Waterfield
  • ISBN: 9780195395235
  • Page: 346
  • Format: Hardcover

Comments

Manray9 Oct 27, 2020 - 23:38 PM
At just 212 pages of text, Robin Waterfield's Dividing the Spoils: The War for Alexander the Great's Empire is a short overview of the struggles for supremacy between Alexander's successors during the forty years following his untimely death. The wars and political maneuvers of this era created the three dynastic kingdoms, the Antigonid, Seleucid and Ptolemaic, that characterized Western history's Hellenistic period. Alexander's successors engaged in almost continuous warfare from 323-281 BCE †[...]
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Juliew. Oct 27, 2020 - 23:38 PM
I learned a lot from this and was absolutely glad I decided to read it.Not only does it explain the dividing of Alexander's empire after his death but also the social,religious,artistic and political circumstances of the times.It takes the reader through each Successor explaining how each was awarded territory and how they sought to control,hold and expand it while fighting for the ultimate prize of the the empire in it's entirety.I thought the military descriptions for some of the battles were [...]
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Erik Graff Oct 27, 2020 - 23:38 PM
I read an "uncorrected advance reading copy" of this book from Oxford University Press, not this beautiful hardcover. Reconstructing a succinct history of the successors to Alexander the Great and of the early years of the Hellenistic period for a general readership is a daunting task. Sources are few and tendentious, focused on the major protagonists; contestants to his legacy are many; alliances, political and military, are complex, ever-changing and usually short lived. While the recent confl [...]
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Myke Cole Oct 27, 2020 - 23:38 PM
Waterfield's contribution has the major distinction of joining Romm's Ghost on the Throne as pretty much one of the ONLY books in English covering the Successor Wars that followed the death of Alexander the Great. It's a damn shame, as this was a critical period in ancient history, one that gave rise of much of the cultural mores and geopolitical realities we take for granted today.Waterfield, like Romm, does the topic justice. Waterfield lacks Romm's storytelling instincts or his poetic prose s [...]
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Steve Oct 27, 2020 - 23:38 PM
Here is my ratings breakout.Content: 5 starsWriting: 3 starsI generally shy away from connecting books with currently fashionable and "hot" cultural trends, but if you are looking for a real life "Game of Thrones" with all of the murder and mayhem, a little of the sex, and without the supernatural, the forty year period of the wars of Alexander the Great's successors is it!This book really opened my eyes to the importance of this period, all too often ignored and glossed over by general historie [...]
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Anna Spark Oct 27, 2020 - 23:38 PM
A very clear account of the Successor Wars.
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Jo Walton Oct 27, 2020 - 23:38 PM
Neither as detailed nor as readable as Romm's Ghost On The Throne, but it covers a wider period and has very valuable chapters on art and social changes.
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Fred Oct 27, 2020 - 23:38 PM
This book wasn't the best that I have read on the subject but it wasn't bad. It doesn't go into as much detail as Ghost on the Throne by James Romm, but it covers a generation or two longer in time than Romm's book. Romm's book was extremely detailed but only covered the 20-30 years after Alexander's death. This book by comparison covers about 60 years or so.I think that the last half of the book was better than the first in many ways. If there were characters covered more than the others it wou [...]
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Darrick Taylor Oct 27, 2020 - 23:38 PM
A very well written narrative of the seventy or so years that succeeded the death of Alexander the Great, and how his empire was divided by his successors, Dividing the Spoils is the first history written by Robin Waterfield, a translator who has translated many texts from the ancient world for Oxford Classics and other imprints. Dividing the Spoils is a narrative history largely aimed at a general audience, though it does nod at the scholarship on the subject, and does a good job of telling wha [...]
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Greg Santana Oct 27, 2020 - 23:38 PM
I don't blame the author. Waterfield did a great job with the material give. I started this book about a year ago but took frequent breaks because it was a tough read for me.I was thinking another title for this book could be "Chaos after Alexander".Because everything you could think of, happened. Assassinations? Yes. Corruption? Yes. Desertion? Yes. Infidelity? Yes. Incest? Yes. Betrayal? Yes. Battles? Yes. Religion? Yes. Political plots? Yes. I'm probably missing a bunch more.Not only were the [...]
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Nathan Albright Oct 27, 2020 - 23:38 PM
As someone who has read a great deal of the history about the Hellenistic era from one perspective or another [1], it is immensely pleasing to be able to read a book that tackles the period of Greek history between the death of Alexander the Great and the final division of the Eastern Mediterranean into a few competing kingdoms that have given up the ambitions for ruling over the whole area. These wars were immensely important, not least because of the misery they inflicted upon the Eastern Medi [...]
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Tad Crawford Oct 27, 2020 - 23:38 PM
Alexander the Great conquered the Persian Empire and marched as far as modern Pakistan before reluctantly returning to Babylon. There, on June 11, 323 BCE, Alexander died at the age of 32. Whether the cause of death was wounds, disease, or poison will never be known. Nor had any preparation been made for the peaceful appointment of a successor. Alexander’s youth might have made him feel the consideration of a successor was unnecessary. Or perhaps it was his deification, his identification as a [...]
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Gavin Oct 27, 2020 - 23:38 PM
'Dividing the Spoils: The War For Alexander The Great's Empire' is the first book I have read by the author Robin Waterfield. It is also the first book, my induction as it were, into reading about the 'Diadochi' or Alexander's successors. These great generals were the ones who through political joking (e.g. controlling Alexander relatives), and through pitched battles, and sieges divided up Alexander Empire over a period of forty years. Robin Waterfield's work isn't merely a Grand Narrative outl [...]
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Caroline Oct 27, 2020 - 23:38 PM
The death of any powerful leader with no obvious successor or heir inevitably creates a vacuum, inevitably leads to a power struggle between those left behind - and what great leader of antiquity existed than Alexander the Great, conqueror of much of the known world? When Alexander died at the age of thirty-three, having won himself an empire that stretched from Greece to India, encompassing Egypt, Persia, Babylon, Afghanistan and Syria, he alone was the glue that held these disparate lands and [...]
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John Oct 27, 2020 - 23:38 PM
An interesting history of the years following the premature death of Alexander the Great. His vast kingdom was divided by men who deeply wanted to be the next great warrior emperor. None of that came to pass, as they continually fought for almost 40 years and then intermittently for years to come. The kingdoms they created lasted until the burgeoning Roman era of conquest. It was a time of world war, as battle spread from the Indus to Macedon and Egypt. Well-written and driving, we are introduce [...]
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Benjamin Oct 27, 2020 - 23:38 PM
If you, like me, were the sort to look at a map of the ancient world after Alexander's death, his territories divided between his generals, Rome a mere blot of blood on the western periphery, and wondered however did they decide that, then this is the book for you. This period of political savagery tends to be glossed over with great haste in most surveys of the ancient world, serving as a sort of pause in the narrative of classical civilization after Alexander's conquests right before Rome begi [...]
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Margaret Sankey Oct 27, 2020 - 23:38 PM
Untangling the 40 years of power struggle after Alexander the Great's untimely death, in which companions, half-siblings, sisters, in-laws, rivals, conquered peoples and various ambitious players (including Chandragupta Maurya) jostled to take all of the recently and imperfectly Hellenized world, and then settled for carving it into the distinctive chunks they would rule until encountering Roman hegemony. Complete with enough double-crosses, polygamous marriages, alliances of convenience, bribes [...]
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Megan Oct 27, 2020 - 23:38 PM
I picked this book up because I've enjoyed historical fiction novels set around the time of Alexander the Great, and I wanted to learn the history from around that time.I put this book down after about 50 pages because it wasn't engaging me. The author was obviously very knowledgeable, but I was getting mired in names, battles, and dates without having any human information to pin to these things. The leading figures were dry - described by actions like chess pieces. The actions they were taking [...]
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Robert Oct 27, 2020 - 23:38 PM
Robin Waterfield's "Dividing the Spoils" came with me on a camping trip and to the amusement of my companions, kept me occupied a great deal. It was clearly written and presents the wars of the Diodachi, or the successors of Alexander the Great. We all know what Alexander did and how successful a general he was. But he was at the head of many great generals, many of whom went on to their own glory, although none able to unify the fractured empire of Alexander. I thought the book was a good balan [...]
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Glenn Robinson Oct 27, 2020 - 23:38 PM
I learned a great deal of the post-Alexander The Great world. The empire that he built was broken up within months into a number of competing territories. First by diplomatic agreement and then by warfare. Each governor wanting to rebuild and regain the empire that Alexander built, but none succeeding. There was a great deal of marriages of relatives of each of these kings and of the sisters and daughters of Alexander the Great. There was also a great deal of murders among the same crew as they [...]
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John Oct 27, 2020 - 23:38 PM
4 stars - I really liked it. I recommend this to anyone, who like me, is naturally curious about the history of the mediterranean lands in the period after the end of the classical period and before the start of Roman dominance. The history is explained at just the right level of detail for my interest, covering not just the wars and battles but also explaining the overall developments in society, politics, culture, art and religion. I found the book very entertaining yet not trivial as is often [...]
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Andy Oct 27, 2020 - 23:38 PM
Good book. Informative writing about the confused period after the death of Alexander and the wars between his successors, who seem to be a bunch of complete psychopaths. Some quirky references to Macedon being comprised of 'cantons' run by 'barons'. Strange insistence of the author that the successors are the antecedents of early modern European kingship. The history of the wars of the successors (six wars in all, over c.40 years) is interspersed with wider discussion of the development of Hell [...]
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Mark Oct 27, 2020 - 23:38 PM
This is a good overview of the period immediately following Alexander the Great's untimely death in 323 BCE (BC). Alexander's generals and other close associate, and their children, spent the next 50 years fighting over his empire. Robin Waterfield is another of that uniquely British author who has solid academic credentials but choses to write articulate and well researched histories for a broader audience.While these events happened over 2,300 years ago the world that Alexander and his success [...]
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Brian Oct 27, 2020 - 23:38 PM
This is the first book I've read on my 3 gen. Kindle that I wished I had read as a paper book. I think my rating would have been higher but I kept having to switch to the map and biographies in the back of the Kindle that it kind of broke the momentum of the narrative up. Still very worth reading as it is an era of history which hasn't received nearly the attention by popular historians that it deserves.
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Craig Oct 27, 2020 - 23:38 PM
Great for hard core history buffs. The historical record is sketchy for much of the covered period and the book is occasionally slow-going with the movement of armies and territorial jockeying for position. The founding of the Ptolemaic dynasty in Egypt is interesting. But since the very little has been written about the immediate decades of the post-Alexander era, this book definitely makes a significant contribution to filling that gap.
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Jason Oct 27, 2020 - 23:38 PM
A brief (in terms of your typical history books) overview of the years of fighting after Alexander the Great's death. Quite an interesting time, was hard to follow some of the names, but not the author's fault. Plenty of political intrigue to keep you interested. Also covers some of the cultural and religious happenings to give you a feel of the world
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Kim Oct 27, 2020 - 23:38 PM
It had some interesting facts that I was interested in, such as the fate of Alexander's mother, wife, and son, but the rest of it was really dry reading. I was rather disappointed too, because this was a time period that I knew little about and was really excited to learn something new. It was just really dense and became a chore to get through.
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Daniel Oct 27, 2020 - 23:38 PM
A very good brief history of the Successor Wars following the death of Alexander. While It could of used a bit more detail in parts it is a very well done overview of the entire history starting with the Babylon Confrences and ending with the death of Seculeus by betrayal. I enjoyed it enough to read it basicly in one sitting.
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Frank Oct 27, 2020 - 23:38 PM
A reasonable, if not brilliantly written gap filler, narrating the competition between Alexander's generals following his death. The account inevitably deals with a large list of characters. You will need to have read account(s) of Alexander's campaigns beforehand. I recommend Arrian, Quintus Curtius Rufus, or even Mary Stewart, for a fairly reliable fictionalisation.
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Zane Oct 27, 2020 - 23:38 PM
For the large amount of actors involved, Waterfield does an excellent job of moving an individual through the many plots and intrigues of this time period. I initially read this book to fill in my gap of understanding between Alexander the Great and the Roman empires conquest of the known world. Waterfield does a superb job on delivering that.
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Dividing the Spoils: The War for Alexander the Great's Empire By Robin A.H. Waterfield Alexander the Great conquered an enormous empire stretching from Greece to the Indian subcontinent and his death triggered forty bloody years of world changing events These were years filled with high adventure, intrigue, passion, assassinations, dynastic marriages, treachery, shifting alliances, and mass slaughter on battlefield after battlefield And while the men fouAlexander the Great conquered an enormous empire stretching from Greece to the Indian subcontinent and his death triggered forty bloody years of world changing events These were years filled with high adventure, intrigue, passion, assassinations, dynastic marriages, treachery, shifting alliances, and mass slaughter on battlefield after battlefield And while the men fought on the field, the women, such as Alexander s mother Olympias, schemed from their palaces and pavilions.Dividing the Spoils serves up a fast paced narrative that captures this turbulent time as it revives the memory of the Successors of Alexander and their great contest for his empire The Successors, Robin Waterfield shows, were no mere plunderers Indeed, Alexander left things in great disarray at the time of his death, with no guaranteed succession, no administration in place suitable for such a large realm, and huge untamed areas both bordering and within his empire It was the Successors battle tested companions of Alexander such as Ptolemy, Perdiccas, Seleucus, and Antigonus the One Eyed who consolidated Alexander s gains Their competing ambitions, however, eventually led to the break up of the empire To tell their story in full, Waterfield draws upon a wide range of historical materials, providing the first account that makes complete sense of this highly complex period.Astonishingly, this period of brutal, cynical warfare was also characterized by brilliant cultural achievements, especially in the fields of philosophy, literature, and art A new world emerged from the dust and haze of battle, and, in addition to chronicling political and military events, Waterfield provides ample discussion of the amazing cultural flowering of the early Hellenistic Age.

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  • Free Read [Travel Book] Ì Dividing the Spoils: The War for Alexander the Great's Empire - by Robin A.H. Waterfield ¹
    346 Robin A.H. Waterfield
  • thumbnail Title: Free Read [Travel Book] Ì Dividing the Spoils: The War for Alexander the Great's Empire - by Robin A.H. Waterfield ¹
    Posted by:Robin A.H. Waterfield
    Published :2020-07-20T23:38:50+00:00